Just Starting Out in Astronomy?

Advice about buying whatever your budget and aspirations...

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M42 - The Orion Nebula - note the satellite trail

Just has to be my best image to date - always a good nebula to look at, with the naked eye, through binoculars, telescopes or cameras...

M27 - The Dumbell Nebula

Another stunning image taken from my back garden this autumn...

Moonscape

The closest planet to earth - within easy reach of everyone to take photographs...

M57 - The Ring Nebula

One of my all time favourite images...

NGC7000 - The North American Nebula

My first nigfht just using my camera and 400mm lens on my mount...

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Taken in the village unless otherwise stated...

 

Advice for Beginners

Try Binoculars First:

So, you're think of startinmg out in Astronomy but not sure where to start?
There is no better way than to start using a pair of binoculars. I would suggest to anyone wishing to start off in astronomy to use just a pair of binoculars for at least 12 months. This will give you a good indication of how often you go out viewing. They are portable and there is no setting up involved. You can be outside and viewing in a matter of seconds. A pair of 8x40's or 10x 50's are ideal. You will be able to see craters on the moon, the rings around Saturn and the moons and belts of Jupiter. You can even look at The Andromeda Galaxy a mere 2.5 million light years away. You will also be able to see start clusters, constellations and even some nebulae.

So You're Hooked:

So you've decided astronomy is for you. What equipment should I buy and why? There are a number of factors which need to be considered when purchasing astronomy gear. These are:

  1. Your budget.
  2. Your aspirations. Are you looking to take serious images, some snaps, or just do visual work?

Budget:

I suspect your budget will fall into one of the following categories:

  1. Under £100
  2. £100 to £249
  3. £250 to £499
  4. £500 to £999
  5. over £1,000
 

 

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